What Bugged the Dinosaurs?

What Bugged the Dinosaurs?

Insects, Disease, and Death in the Cretaceous

Book - 2008
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Baker & Taylor
This book reveals that T. rex was not the only killer in the Cretaceous: insects--from biting sand flies to disease-causing parasites--dominated life on the planet and played a significant role in the life and death of the dinosaurs. Analyzing exotic insects fossilized in Cretaceous amber at three major deposits in Lebanon, Burma, and Canada, the authors reconstruct the complex ecology of a hostile prehistoric world inhabited by voracious swarms of insects. They draw upon tantalizing new evidence from their discoveries of disease-producing vertebrate pathogens in Cretaceous blood-sucking flies, as well as intestinal worms and protozoa found in fossilized dinosaur excrement, to provide a unique view of how insects infected with malaria, leishmania, and other pathogens, together with intestinal parasites, could have devastated dinosaur populations.--From publisher description.

Princeton University Press

Millions of years ago in the Cretaceous period, the mighty Tyrannosaurus rex--with its dagger-like teeth for tearing its prey to ribbons--was undoubtedly the fiercest carnivore to roam the Earth. Yet as What Bugged the Dinosaurs? reveals, T. rex was not the only killer. George and Roberta Poinar show how insects--from biting sand flies to disease-causing parasites--dominated life on the planet and played a significant role in the life and death of the dinosaurs.


The Poinars bring the age of the dinosaurs marvelously to life. Analyzing exotic insects fossilized in Cretaceous amber at three major deposits in Lebanon, Burma, and Canada, they reconstruct the complex ecology of a hostile prehistoric world inhabited by voracious swarms of insects. The Poinars draw upon tantalizing new evidence from their amazing discoveries of disease-producing vertebrate pathogens in Cretaceous blood-sucking flies, as well as intestinal worms and protozoa found in fossilized dinosaur excrement, to provide a unique view of how insects infected with malaria, leishmania, and other pathogens, together with intestinal parasites, could have devastated dinosaur populations.


A scientific adventure story from the authors whose research inspired Jurassic Park, What Bugged the Dinosaurs?? offers compelling evidence of how insects directly and indirectly contributed to the dinosaurs' demise.



Publisher: Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2008
ISBN: 0691124310 (alk. paper)
9780691124315 (alk. paper)
Branch Call Number: 560.45 POI
Characteristics: x, 264 p., 16 p. of plates : ill. (some col.), maps ; 24 cm
Additional Contributors: Poinar, Roberta

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mammothhawk229e
Mar 24, 2018

Bugs, nematodes, fungi, parasites & microorganisms provided an alternative d'uh theory of why dinosaurs died.
Climate change could drastically change pest mix. Author used modern examples to hammer his thesis.
Many of the drawn examples were ugly ,but cool!

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shlby69m
Jul 21, 2015

Full of info. Kinda boring except a part about a bee starting a hive.

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